19 plays

baruchobramowitz:

עבדו את יי בשמחה
בואו לפניו ברננה

ISRAEL MEMORIES!!!!!!!!!!

rabioheab:

*seductively plays hot cross buns on the recorder*

the feels

i’m having this huge welling up of gratitude and self-direction because i’m finally taking my life into my own hands.

there’s no stopping me! i’m choosing what’s best for me. thank God for spiritual awakenings, the precious people who i have crossed paths with (in this last month you’ve all touched my heart), and the courage to love and respect myself.

ski-u-mah:

U OF M GRADUATION CAP DESIGNS
Future Gophers: Show your University of Minnesota spirit and pride by decorating your graduation cap with a U of M design.
Click here to choose from one of the four designs below! Print it out and pin or glue it to your graduation cap. Congratulations and Ski-U-Mah!

eeeeekkk i can’t wait to start at the U next semester :) :)

ski-u-mah:

U OF M GRADUATION CAP DESIGNS

Future Gophers: Show your University of Minnesota spirit and pride by decorating your graduation cap with a U of M design.

Click here to choose from one of the four designs below! Print it out and pin or glue it to your graduation cap. Congratulations and Ski-U-Mah!

eeeeekkk i can’t wait to start at the U next semester :) :)


Meditation appears to produce enduring changes in emotional processing in the brain
A new study has found that participating in an 8-week meditation training program can have measurable effects on how the brain functions even when someone is not actively meditating. In their report in the November issue of Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston University (BU), and several other research centers also found differences in those effects based on the specific type of meditation practiced.
“The two different types of meditation training our study participants completed yielded some differences in the response of the amygdala – a part of the brain known for decades to be important for emotion – to images with emotional content,” says Gaëlle Desbordes, PhD, a research fellow at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH and at the BU Center for Computational Neuroscience and Neural Technology, corresponding author of the report. “This is the first time that meditation training has been shown to affect emotional processing in the brain outside of a meditative state.”
Several previous studies have supported the hypothesis that meditation training improves practitioners’ emotional regulation. While neuroimaging studies have found that meditation training appeared to decrease activation of the amygdala – a structure at the base of the brain that is known to have a role in processing memory and emotion – those changes were only observed while study participants were meditating. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that meditation training could also produce a generalized reduction in amygdala response to emotional stimuli, measurable by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Meditation appears to produce enduring changes in emotional processing in the brain

A new study has found that participating in an 8-week meditation training program can have measurable effects on how the brain functions even when someone is not actively meditating. In their report in the November issue of Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston University (BU), and several other research centers also found differences in those effects based on the specific type of meditation practiced.

“The two different types of meditation training our study participants completed yielded some differences in the response of the amygdala – a part of the brain known for decades to be important for emotion – to images with emotional content,” says Gaëlle Desbordes, PhD, a research fellow at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH and at the BU Center for Computational Neuroscience and Neural Technology, corresponding author of the report. “This is the first time that meditation training has been shown to affect emotional processing in the brain outside of a meditative state.”

Several previous studies have supported the hypothesis that meditation training improves practitioners’ emotional regulation. While neuroimaging studies have found that meditation training appeared to decrease activation of the amygdala – a structure at the base of the brain that is known to have a role in processing memory and emotion – those changes were only observed while study participants were meditating. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that meditation training could also produce a generalized reduction in amygdala response to emotional stimuli, measurable by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

thepeoplesrecord:

Prop 37 defeated: California voters reject mandatory GMO labelingNovember 8, 2012
California voters rejected Prop 37, which would have required retailers and food companies to label products made with genetically modified ingredients.
Millions of dollars, mostly from outside of California, were poured into campaigns both for and against Prop 37. But the donations that came in weighed heavily in favor of Prop 37’s opponents.
Companies like Monsanto and The Hershey Co. contributed to what was eventually a $44 million windfall for “No on Prop 37,” while proponents were only able to raise $7.3 million, reports California Watch.
Still, despite the lopsided campaign funding power, voting on Prop 37 was relatively close. As of this story’s publish time (98.5 percent of precincts reporting), Prop 37 was able to gain 47 percent of California’s vote.
Opponents of Prop 37 blitzed California with campaign ads on a variety of different reasons GMO labeling would be costly for consumers and punitive to businesses like small farms and mom-and-pop stores. The anti-Prop 37 movement also gained endorsements from prominent publications like the Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Chronicle — not necessarily because the newspapers were against GMO labeling, but because of the way the ballot initiative was written.
Meanwhile, Prop 37 found supporters among celebrities, the restaurant world and food movement activists like Michael Pollan. In a piece for the New York Times, Pollan hailed its potential for igniting a nationwide debate about the industrial food complex:
Already, Prop 37 has ignited precisely the kind of debate — about the risks and benefits of genetically modified food; about transparency and the consumer’s right to know — that Monsanto and its allies have managed to stifle in Washington for nearly two decades.
If California had passed Prop 37, it would have been the first state in the U.S. to pass GMO labeling legislation. China, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, countries in the European Union, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Russia, India and Chile are just a few of the nations that already require GMO foods to be labeled.
Source
Look at all those countries who have stood up to GMOs. We have a right to know what we’re eating! 

thepeoplesrecord:

Prop 37 defeated: California voters reject mandatory GMO labeling
November 8, 2012

California voters rejected Prop 37, which would have required retailers and food companies to label products made with genetically modified ingredients.

Millions of dollars, mostly from outside of California, were poured into campaigns both for and against Prop 37. But the donations that came in weighed heavily in favor of Prop 37’s opponents.

Companies like Monsanto and The Hershey Co. contributed to what was eventually a $44 million windfall for “No on Prop 37,” while proponents were only able to raise $7.3 million, reports California Watch.

Still, despite the lopsided campaign funding power, voting on Prop 37 was relatively close. As of this story’s publish time (98.5 percent of precincts reporting), Prop 37 was able to gain 47 percent of California’s vote.

Opponents of Prop 37 blitzed California with campaign ads on a variety of different reasons GMO labeling would be costly for consumers and punitive to businesses like small farms and mom-and-pop stores. The anti-Prop 37 movement also gained endorsements from prominent publications like the Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Chronicle — not necessarily because the newspapers were against GMO labeling, but because of the way the ballot initiative was written.

Meanwhile, Prop 37 found supporters among celebrities, the restaurant world and food movement activists like Michael Pollan. In a piece for the New York Times, Pollan hailed its potential for igniting a nationwide debate about the industrial food complex:

Already, Prop 37 has ignited precisely the kind of debate — about the risks and benefits of genetically modified food; about transparency and the consumer’s right to know — that Monsanto and its allies have managed to stifle in Washington for nearly two decades.

If California had passed Prop 37, it would have been the first state in the U.S. to pass GMO labeling legislation. China, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, countries in the European Union, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Russia, India and Chile are just a few of the nations that already require GMO foods to be labeled.

Source

Look at all those countries who have stood up to GMOs. We have a right to know what we’re eating! 

What’s the worst possible thing you can call a woman? Don’t hold back, now.
You’re probably thinking of words like slut, whore, bitch, cunt (I told you not to hold back!), skank.
Okay, now, what are the worst things you can call a guy? Fag, girl, bitch, pussy. I’ve even heard the term “mangina.”
Notice anything? The worst thing you can call a girl is a girl. The worst thing you can call a guy is a girl. Being a woman is the ultimate insult. Now tell me that’s not royally fucked up.

Jessica Valenti (via weshouldtotallyjuststabcaesar)

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Cesare Borgia, Duke of Valentinois and Gonfaloniere of the Papal Armies. {1475-1507} Perhaps best known as a ruthless murderer with (rumoured) incestuous impulses and an unfortunate history of syphilis. Nonetheless, he was dashingly handsome and a charismatic leader. Not to mention be good friends with Leonardo Da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli. Cesare also came very close to being the first person to consolidate the Duchies and Principalities of Italy into a Kingdom, way back in the 15th Century. Oh, and the modern-day image of Jesus Christ is apparently based on him— so amazing!

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Cesare Borgia, Duke of Valentinois and Gonfaloniere of the Papal Armies. {1475-1507} Perhaps best known as a ruthless murderer with (rumoured) incestuous impulses and an unfortunate history of syphilis. Nonetheless, he was dashingly handsome and a charismatic leader. Not to mention be good friends with Leonardo Da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli. Cesare also came very close to being the first person to consolidate the Duchies and Principalities of Italy into a Kingdom, way back in the 15th Century. Oh, and the modern-day image of Jesus Christ is apparently based on him— so amazing!